Rhetorical Essay On Martin Luther King Speech

Rather than Thatcher’s heartfelt vote of sympathy for a colleague presumably known by most within the conference, Luther Kings audiences only common ground is their struggle and desire to take action, and he attempts to arrest the feeling of this need.

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Educators go through a rigorous application process, and every answer they submit is reviewed by our in-house editorial team. Initially, the repeating of "I Have a Dream" helps to bring to light the idea that what is in King's mind is not reality. Initially, the repeating of "I Have a Dream" helps to bring to light the idea that what is in King's mind is not reality.

This idea of "a dream" helped to awaken many Americans to the reality that Civil Rights violations are not localized and isolated incidents. This idea of "a dream" helped to awaken many Americans to the reality that Civil Rights violations are not localized and isolated incidents.

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‘Although, of course, the tones of these voices are very different, Thatcher taking a ‘cheap shot’ at the Labour party while King is striving to keep his protest on the ‘high plane of dignity and discipline,’ they both contrast their message with failures of a rival institution or the system as a whole.

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Cynics could of course dismiss this element of rhetoric as merely a desperate attempt to cover up ones own lurking bad points with those of others, although if skilfully done, it can help immensely to highlight these problems and bring down the audience perception of what could be seen as a rival problem.Rather, they are expressions of a state of being that is contrary to American History and instants that go against the fundamental nature of the nation. King's repeating of "I have a dream." In each of its uses, the phrase evokes a vision of America that is contrary to its reality.The repetition technique expertly shows how different American reality is from American history.Indeed, religious and civil rights speakers, like Luther King, often depend rather more on verbal eloquence and spontaneous creativity than their political counterparts.In a setting that is less formal and subject to passions rather than cleverly crafted spin, little of these speeches may be scribed in advance and an old African tradition of ‘call and response’ has been noted by the linguistic researchers ‘Keith and Whittenberger Keith (1986.) Indeed, this is evident several times over in Kings speech, firstly as a call to all in the first line, and then again with open comments ‘statement.Both of these lines, and more in the speech besides, showcase this ‘call and response’, while one notes that in Margaret Thatcher’s speech she appears to address and name check ‘Mr President’ when she addresses her audience, offering a more official line of diction.It is also evident that King, in the style of such old African or Pentecostal preachers, uses stark proverbs and a great deal of imagery within his words to ensure that his point is shown starkly to the many different sections of the community, both educated and not, that may be watching him perform.So, in conclusion and despite the differing social and political contexts of the situations, Thatcher’s and Kings speeches, although unsurprisingly differently constructed and clearly intended for different audiences, contain many similarities in the type of rhetorical devices they use to get their messages across. Margaret Thatcher and Martin Luther King Speech Comparison [Internet]. [Accessed 7 September 2019]; Available from: https:// Thatcher’s arguably more familiar and amusing speech is certainly more frivolous and snide at times, while Kings ‘I have a dream’ seems more spontaneous and impassioned, but in terms of historical importance, this seems unsurprising. King repeats ‘I have a dream’ at the beginning of eight sentences rising to a feverish crescendo of spoken word politics to amplify and continuously reinforce his message (see end of his speech) and Thatcher uses the device more sparsely to achieve similar results.‘Such ‘rhyming’ words coupled with exciting imagery within them (King uses ‘sweltering’ and ‘Oasis’ to compare the contemporary situation and his future vision of the state of Mississippi) can excite an audience and also give them a cue to respond in applause or a ‘holler back’ situation, depending on the nature of the address itself.

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